Three Meditative Traditions In The Chinese Martial Arts

Warrior of Stillness is a three volume series on the power of meditation and how it relates to Chinese martial art. It describes meditative traditions in the Chinese martial arts as a result of studying under a California based master. They involve both physical and mental aspects that help an individual to achieve perfection from within.

The impact is instant as one begins reading through the chapters of this book. The description involves insightful theories, practical suggestions and anecdotes that make an easy read. The availability of a historical perspective makes the concepts appreciative and easy to understand for readers and would be artists. It helps them to achieve depth in this endeavor.

A notable point of discussion is the search for Wuji. This is described as a central point in the body which acts as the pole. It is incorporated in the Taiji tradition and leads to incredible improvements. The text places the explanation in a way that makes it easier to understand compared to other writers. One can easily identify the Taiji sphere and the cylinders.

The author is particular about the centrality of Wuji as a basic when one seeks to engage in any martial art. Mastering the standing posture makes the others easier to understand. The posture requires one to spread hands and create a center of balance for the body.

Sifu Jan creates more awareness on the body mechanic in his presentations. Understanding your body frame is crucial in achieving perfect balance. It makes meditation easy to achieve for an individual. A combination of physical and mental tuning helps to align the body in readiness for change.

The book has a regulative, calculative and unique way of introducing inner energy. By experience, Tai chi relaxes the mind and helps to control blood pressure. It has been recommended by cardiologist as a natural remedy.

The experiences shared by senior masters depict the ease with which inner strength is built. An artist who has grown used to soft arts is easily assimilated through the exercises suggested. Pivotal exercises described in the book include the Grasp Bird Tail, which involves motion, and Qigong, which is achieved from a still position.

The target for the title is both amateurs and experienced artists. It offers a simplistic guide on how these skills can be mastered. The author insists on consistency in practice as the best way to achieve desired results. Simple moves must be mastered as well if an individual desires to make a difference in martial arts.

The first volume was published in 1995 covering the Qigong center. It was followed by volume 2 which covered The Tao of Yiquan and was released in 1999. The author describes his experiences as recorded during meditation sessions with masters.

2013 saw the release of Masters of Perception as the third volume in the trilogy. It goes beyond the power and breadth of the masters as witnessed during intense meditation. They gain extraordinary depth and subtleness that comes with years of practice. Mastery of the art, according to the author comes from concentration and practice. It has been described as one title that delivers value for money.

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